7th Czech Philosophy of Sport Conference, October 25th-26th

7th Czech Philosophy of Sport Conference

You are cordially invited to the 7th Czech Philosophy of Sport Conference, which will take place at the Faculty of Physical Culture in Olomouc, on October 25th-26th, 2018 under the auspices of the Philosophy of Sport Section of the Czech Kinanthropological Society (PSS/CKS), together with the European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS).

We invite colleagues from PSS/CKS, BPSA, EAPS, IAPS to participate. If you intend to attend, please let us know: annavang@seznam.cz

Find further information click here.

Registration form.

Special Issue of Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Slow Philosophy, Slow Sport: Understanding emersiology in Philosophy of Sport (2019)

Slow Philosophy, Slow Sport: Understanding emersiology in Philosophy of Sport

Editors:  Irena Martínková and Bernard Andrieu

It has been said that the ‘Slow Living Movement’ began with the Slow Food Movement started by Carlo Petrini in Italy in 1986, as a reaction to the opening of a McDonald’s fast food outlet in his town. He emphasized the eating of fresh, local, sustainable and ethical foods, prepared leisurely and with love, and consumed in the company of good friends and family.

More recently, Michelle Boulous Walker (Walker 2016) has argued for Slow Philosophy. Since philosophy involves the patient work of thought, philosophy can be described as the art of reading slowly – and this inevitably clashes with many of our current institutional practices and demands.

The question arises: can we resist the era of accelerated time and can we spot innovative experiments of deceleration (Marie, Thomas, 2006)? If performance and speed have long governed the relationship to the body and space in modern societies, contemporary ethical and environmental concerns call for a ‘slow philosophy’: slow sport, slow tourism, slow food, slow sex, slow management, slow design, slow urbanism, etc. Our question now is how to (re-)think bodily experience in a culture of slowness, slow sport, ecomobility and substainability (Borne, Ponting, 2017).

This Special Issue proposes to question the epistemological implications (Andrieu, 2014) of this ‘turn’ to slow culture, and the implications of the practice of ‘slowness’ for the body, sports, leisure activities, and social, spatial and touristic transformations. In connection with the reflections initiated in the field of body ecology (Andrieu. Parry, Porrovechio, Sirost. eds, 2018), we propose to extend the debates around ‘emersiology’(Andrieu, Nobrega, Sirost, 2018), by focusing on the quality of experiencing (Martinkova, Parry, 2011), the body depth discovered by the emersion of awareness in slow sport, games and challenges of spatiality, mobility and corporeality, and by the immersion of the body in emersive leisure activities (Andrieu, Loland, 2017).

We propose to consider the awakening and mindfulness practices of Tai chi, yoga, Qi Gong and other modes of relaxation or meditation; aquatic itineraries concerning apnoea, surfing, kayaking, paddling, long-coast, etc., illustrating a close intimacy with the natural environment of practice; and other modes of wandering or roaming such cycling, pedestrianism, Nordic walking, slacklining, off-piste, etc – all bypassing competition and motivated by a will of slowness.

By modifying the quality of one’s life practices, the individual transforms his ecology through micro-situations, contemplations of landscapes and micro-experiences that engage our daily responsibility. The objective will be to bring together, in the same thematic axis, body ecology and the sports environment, in order to grasp the mechanisms of slowness experienced in sporting leisure. So, as well as a theoretical consideration of the philosophy of slowness,we hope that there will be presentations on a very wide range of physical and sports activities, illustrating the culture of slowness and its outcomes and effects.

Examples of Possible Themes for Consideration:

  • Slow philosophy – MB Walker and the art of reading slowly
  • Slow sport: games and the challenges of spatiality, mobility and corporeality
  • Slow tourism and the challenges of spatiality, mobility and corporeality
  • The dimensions of the lived body in motor activity
  • Motor experience and bodily registers considered from a phenomenological point of view
  • Heidegger’s understanding of original temporality and its relation to linear time in sporting contexts
  • Micro-phenomenology through experiencing movement in Zen, Tai-chi, Qi Gong and the timing of action
  • Micro-ecology through immersion in an element of nature (water with apnoea, air with slackline, space with weightlessness, oxygen privation in the high montains, isolation in the desert, nordic walking on the earth, in the forest, etc.)
  • Emersion of the living body in esthetic experience, in the discovery of body depth
  • Modification of consciouness by meditation, by yoga,

 

Those interested in contributing to the special issue, please submit a title and a brief abstract for review (200-500 words) to both editors:

Irena Martínková (martinkova.ftvs@seznam.cz)

Bernard Andrieu (bernard.andrieu@parisdescartes.fr)

Abstracts received from now onwards – deadline: June 31, 2018.

Notification of abstract acceptance by (final date) July 31, 2018.

Full manuscripts – deadline: January 31, 2019.

 

Length: 5,000-7,000 words (inclusive of references and notes).

Further information about the journal: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rsep20

Instructions for authors: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=rsep20

 

Bibliography

Allen-Collinson, J and Leledaki, A (2015). Sensing the outdoors: a visual and haptic phenomenology of outdoor exercise embodiment, Leisure Studies 34 (4): 457-470.

Andrieu B., (2014). The Birth of the Philosophy of Sport in France1950-1980. Part 1 From J. Ulmann to André Rauch through Vigarello, Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2014, 8 (1), pp.32-43.

Andrieu B., Loland S. Eds., (2017). The ecology of sport, with body ecology and emersive leisures, Leisure & Society, Special Issue, 40, 1: 1–4.

Andrieu B., Nobrega P. da, Sirost O., (2018). Body Ecology: a new philosophy through cosmotic emersiology, Acta Universitatis Carolinae Kinanthropologica, 54, 1. (forthcoming)

Andrieu B., Parry J., Porrovechio A., Sirost O., eds. (2018). Body Ecology and Emersive Leisure, London: Routledge Research in Sport, Culture and Society.

Borne G., Ponting J., eds., (2017). Sustainable Surfing. London: Routledge Research in Sport, Culture and Society.

Honoré, C. (2004). In Praise of Slow: Challenging the Cult of Speed. London: HarperOne

Marie, K; Thomas, C; (2009). Fast Living Slow Ageing.  New-York : Mileage Media.

Martinkova, I. (2017). Body Ecology: Avoiding body–mind dualism. Loisir et Société / Leisure and Society, vol. 40, 1, pp. 101-112.

Martínková, I.,‎ Parry J., (2011), Zen and Sports: Focusing on the Quality of Experiencing. In J. Parry, N. Watson & M. Nesti (eds.). Theology, Ethics and Transcendence in Sport. New York: Routledge,  pp. 211-222.

Martínková, I.,‎ Parry J., eds., (2012), Phenomenological Approaches to Sport, . London : Routledge Research in Sport, Culture and Society.

Martinkova I and Parry, J. (2016). Heideggerian Hermeneutics and its Application to Sport.  Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, 10, 4: 364-374.

Parkins, W, Craig, G. (2006). Slow Living. Oxford, UK: Berg.

Walker B M. (2016). Slow Philosophy: Reading Against the Institution.  London : Bloomsbury Academic

Workshop: The Rise of International Sport on the Arab Peninsula: Politics, Art, Ethics

Workshop: The Rise of International Sport on the Arab Peninsula: Politics, Art, Ethics.  

August 1-3, 2018, Gulf Research Center Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

(Click on this link to download the pdf version of the call: 137_WS4 – The Rise of International Sport on the Arab Peninsula)
Dr. Rita Elizabeth Risser
Assistant Professor
College of Humanities
Department of Philosophy
United Arab Emirates University
United Arab Emirates
Email: rita.risser@uaeu.ac.ae
Dr. Andrew Edgar
Deputy Head of School and
Head of Subject English, Communication
Philosophy
Cardiff University
United Kingdom
Email: edgar@cardiff.ac.uk

Abstract

This workshop invites research on the politics, art, and ethics of international sport on the Arab Peninsula, with a special interest in the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Qatar.

The deadline for abstract submission is February 10, 2018 (submission should be made through the following portal: http://grm.grc.net/index.php?pgid=NDQ=&fwid=MTM3).

Successful submissions notified by February 28, 2018.

Participants are expected to submit a draft of their paper by the end of May.

The deadline for the submission of final papers is September.

 

Description and Rationale

The discovery of oil reserves on the Arab Peninsula in the early twentieth century brought about rapid socio-political and urban developments set against expanses of desert. Traditional society on the Peninsula has bootstrapped itself, seemingly out of nowhere, into modernity.

The structures of modernity, foremost the nation-state and thriving urban centers, as well as the trappings of modernity such as higher education, capitalist economics, and an appreciation for the arts and sport, have not evolved organically over time in the region. Rather they have been master-planned with a sense of urgency over this short period. And now, with peak oil looming, governments in the region are seeking new ways to sustain this drive toward modernization without a dependence upon oil revenues.

One strategy toward this end is to develop the region’s tourism industry. For example, by developing the region as a new hub in the international worlds of art and sport. Mega-projects such as Saadiyat Islandin the UAE, which will be the home to Guggenheim and Louvre franchises, will presumably make the region a tourist destination. Another mega-project, relevant to this workshop, is the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. However, these projects are not only strategic for building tourism, they will also foster education and culture in the region, and put the Peninsula, particularly the UAE and Qatar, on the map as cultural centers in their own right.

It might be wondered, however, whether there exists an indigenous constituency for international art and sport on the Peninsula, with a capacity to engage critically and productively with the arts and organized sport.

It might seem that the instrumental values of fostering a post-oil economy and international standing are at the heart of these emerging worlds, not a love of art or sport as such. However, ideally Peninsula society will not simply own and/or manage these emerging worlds of international art and sport, but will have a meaningful stake in them. This requires a constituency capable of appreciating the arts and sport as something more than a luxury or recreational good to be managed and consumed, but as something to be engaged in for its own sake.

Indeed, without such a constituency it might also be wondered if the mere trappings of modernity will actually bring modernization to the Peninsula.

 

The Workshop’s Contribution to the Expansion of Gulf Studies

The accelerated rate of modernization on the Peninsula allows little room for error, and the vast wealth being invested in the infrastructure for art and sport on the Peninsula is sobering. It is critical to have some bearing on how, or even whether, the region should stay the course.

For this, it is useful to know the broader implications of staying the course. Can the structures of regional and international sport foster civil society as well as national and global citizenship? Indeed, we might ask how the concepts of ‘civil society’ and ‘citizenship’ are to be articulated in this context? Or is sport only useful as a benevolent form of social engineering and nation building? How, if at all, can the region build a constituency for sport on the Peninsula?

The workshop will bring a critical perspective to the rise of regional and international sport on the Peninsula, as well as open lines of inquiry on this development among scholars from across the disciplines.

 

Anticipated Participants

The workshop welcomes research from across the humanities and social sciences—from the perspective of historians, social and political theorists, philosophers, cultural theorists, as well as from researchers in the arts and architecture—on the ideas and events, and their legitimacy, that are shaping regional and international sport on the Peninsula.

The objective is to gain some bearing on the rapid rise of modern sport in a society that a generation ago was preoccupied with subsistence in a harsh desert environment.

Attention to the rise of regional sport is also welcome, for example the rise of local ‘sports authorities’ in the region. However, the focus will be on the ideologies and their legitimacy underpinning local sport, such as the political ambition for instilling youth with a productive work ethic, or for fostering national pride and allegiance to these young states, or as an opportunity to ‘raise the flag’ at international events.

The workshop especially welcomes research on how the rise of both regional and international sport on the Peninsula impacts on women’s issues within the region, as well as the lives of disadvantaged members of society.

Also welcome are case studies in the arts and architecture of sport on the Peninsula. Will it be enough to build a world-class infrastructure for a successful World Cup? How do the politics of the World Cup impact on the aesthetic value of the architecture and venues of the World Cup in Qatar?

 

Workshop Director Profiles

Dr. Andrew Edgar (DPhil Sussex) is Head of the Philosophy Department and Deputy Head of the School of English, Communication and Philosophy at Cardiff University, Wales. His research interests cover twentieth century German philosophy and contemporary applied philosophy, in particular the philosophy of sport and also medical ethics. He is the current editor of Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, the journal of the British Philosophy of Sport Association. He is president of the European Association for the Philosophy of Sport. A selection of his published research in philosophy of sport is included in the readings list below.

Dr. Rita Elizabeth Risser (PhD McGill University) is an assistant professor in the Philosophy Department at United Arab Emirates University. Her research centers on political and ethical issues as they arise in the arts and architecture. Recently she was a visiting research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at The University of Edinburgh, where she researched the rise of an international art world on the Arab Peninsula. This research is forthcoming in Constellations: An International Journal on Critical and Democratic Theory. She is currently researching the intersection of aesthetic and political issues in the architecture of the upcoming World Cup in Qatar.

 

Selected Readings

Amara M. 2014. “Sport and Political Leaders in the Arab World.” Histoire-PolitiquePolitique, Culture, Sociéte 2: 142–53.

—. 2012. Sport, Politics and Society in the Arab World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Baabood A. 2008. “Sport and Identity in the Gulf.” In Popular Culture and Political Identity in the Arab Gulf States edited by Alsharekh A and Springborg R. London: SOAS, pp. 97–120.

Boxill J. 2006. “Football and Feminism.” Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33: 115–24.

Bromber K. 2014. “The Sporting Way: Sport as Branding Strategy in the Gulf States.” In Under Construction: Logics of Urbanism in the Gulf Region, edited by Wippel S,

Bromber K, Steiner C and Krawietz B. Surrey UK: Ashgate, pp. 119–130.

Bromber K. and Krawietz B. 2013. “The United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain as a Modern Sports Hub.” In Sport Across Asia, edited by Bromber K, Krawietz B and Maguire J. New York: Routledge, pp. 189–211.

Campbell R. 2010. “Staging Globalization for National Projects: Global Sport Markets and Elite Athletic Transnational Labour in Qatar.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 46: 45–60.

Edgar AR. 2013. “The Aesthetics of Sport.” Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7: 80–99.

—. 2013. “The Modernism of Sport.” Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7: 121–139.

Elias N and Dunning E. 1986. Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Guttmann A. 1978. From Ritual to Record: The Nature of Modern Sports (New York: Columbia University Press).

Ross A, editor. 2015. The Gulf: High Culture/Hard Labour. New York and London: OR Books.

Nadine S. 2014. “Off and Running: Qatar Brands for FIFA World Cup, and Life Beyond.” In Under Construction: Logics of Urbanism in the Gulf Region, edited by Wippel S, Bromber K, Steiner C and Krawietz B. Surrey UK: Ashgate, pp. 71–87.

Stevenson, Thomas and Abdul Karim Alaug. 2000. “Football in Newly United Yemen: Rituals of Equity, Identity and State Formation.” Journal of Anthropological Research 54: 45–60.

UNDP. 2016. Arab Human Development Report 2016: Youth and the Prospects for Human Development in a Changing Reality. New York: United Nations Publications.

Weber, Max. [1904–05] 1992. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, edited by Parsons T and translated by Giddens A. Abingdon: Routledge.

CfP: British Philosophy of Sport Association 2018 – Annual Conference

bpsa2

We are pleased to announce the 2018 Conference of the British Philosophy of Sport Association will be hosted by The School of Sport & Exercise Sciences, Swansea University, Wales, UK, April 12-14,   2018.

Venue: The College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University

The Call for Abstracts is Now Open!

Guidelines for Abstract Submission:

  • Abstract (200-300 words) final submission date – 22nd January 2018
  • Accepted abstracts will receive notification by – 12th February 2018
  • Required format is MS Word, Times New Roman 12pt, single spacing, with indicative bibliography; all to fit on one side of A4.
  • Abstracts to be submitted electronically to Dr. John-William Devine with <your name – ABSTRACT – title> as the filename.
  • Papers must be prepared in English. The Programme Committee are very keen to encourage contributors to submit early versions of abstracts or papers for comment and for advice on language issues.

 – Conference Registration and Fees: TBC

  • Transport: 
  • Nearest Airport: Cardiff
  • Nearest Railway Station: Swansea StationEnquiries:
  • Queries should be directed to the Conference Team via Dr. Libby Pearson

Special Issue [Published]. “The Colin Kaepernick Case” in Fair Play: Journal of Philosophy, Ethics and Sports Law

Special Issue [Published]. “The Colin Kaepernick Case” in Fair Play: Journal of Philosophy, Ethics and Sports Law

Issue 10, 2017

Colin Kaepernick protest

El deportista político ¿o politizado? El caso de Colin Kaepernick

José Luis Pérez Triviño

Francisco Javier López Frías.

Kaepernick Flips the Script: Empowering the Silenced Black Athlete

LaToya Brackett

An Argument against Athletes as Political Role Models

Shawn E. Klein

The Revival of Athlete Activism(s): Divergent Black Politics in the 2016 Presidential Election Engagements of LeBron James and Colin Kaepernick

Steve Marston

Zola Budd and the Political Pawn

Pam R. Sailors

Athletic Disobedience: Providing a Context for Analysis of Colin Kaepernick’s Protest

Tom Rorke- Adam Copeland

El deportista político ¿o politizado? El caso de Colin Kaepernick

José Luis Pérez Triviño

Francisco Javier López Frías.

Kaepernick Flips the Script: Empowering the Silenced Black Athlete

LaToya Brackett

An Argument against Athletes as Political Role Models

Shawn E. Klein

The Revival of Athlete Activism(s): Divergent Black Politics in the 2016 Presidential Election Engagements of LeBron James and Colin Kaepernick

Steve Marston

Zola Budd and the Political Pawn

Pam R. Sailors

Athletic Disobedience: Providing a Context for Analysis of Colin Kaepernick’s Protest

Tom Rorke- Adam Copeland

Sport, Ethics and Philosophy. Special Issue: “Bernard Suits’ Legacy: New Inspirations and Interpretations”

Special Issue: “Bernard Suits’ Legacy: New Inspirations and Interpretations.”

 Editors: Filip Kobiela, José Luis Pérez Triviño, and Francisco Javier López Frías

 Ten years after the death of Bernard Suits (1925-2007), the influence of his ideas on the philosophy of sport is still very strong. Only in 2016, three new translations (into Chinese, Japanese and Polish) of Suits’ masterpiece – The Grasshopper: Game, Life, and Utopia – have been published. This indicates growing popularity of his philosophy around the world. Several new articles, dissertations, and book chapters shed new light on Suits’s legacy and – what is especially important – show that his ideas not only belong to the well-established philosophical body of knowledge of game, play, and sport, but they are also a vital part of current philosophical debates. There are still some controversies, and new challenges appear, creating a space for discussion.

This special issue of Sport, Ethics, and Philosophy is dedicated to philosophical and moral questions related to Bernard Suit’s legacy. We welcome in particular papers dealing with new ideas and interpretations of Suits. The following topics and question could be addressed in more detail:

 – Suits’s definition of game playing and its applicability to different types sport (judged sports, mind-sports, e-sport);

– Suits’s formalism and logical incompatibility thesis;

–  Suits’s account of constitutive rules;

– The lusory attitude. Definitions of play and problems of professionalism/amateurism;

– The distinction between lusory and prelusory goal and its consequences;

–  Suits’s vision of Utopia and moral ideal of man;

– The “Tricky triad” and the controversy over the game status of judged sports;

– Games, morality and Suits’ analysis of life as game and morality as game metaphors;

– Philosophical polemics: Suits vs Wittgenstein, Caillois, Berne, Kolnai, McBride, etc.;

–  The integrity of content and form of Suits’s work: use of Aesop’s fable, “ludic” dialogues, illustrative tales, word play;

  Those interested in contributing with a manuscript to the special issue, please, submit a tentative title and a brief abstract for review (500 words) to the editors.

 For further questions and inquiries, contact: Filip Kobiela (f.kobiela@iphils.uj.edu.pl)

Jose Luis Perez (jose.perez@upf.edu) and Francisco Javier López (fjl13@psu.edu)

 Planning:

 Abstract submission deadline: October 30, 2017

Notification of abstract acceptance: November 30, 2017

Full manuscript submission deadline: May 30, 2018

Publication: End of 2018/Early 2019

 Length: 6,000-8,000 words (inclusive of references and notes).

 Further information about the journal: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rsep20

Instructions for authors: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=rsep20

References

1) Bernard Suits’s works:

Suits, B. (1967a). What is a Game? “Philosophy of Science”, 34, 148-56.

Suits, B. (1967b). Is Life a Game We are Playing? “Ethics”, 77, 209-13.

Suits, B. (1969). Games and Paradox, “Philosophy of Science”, 36, 316-21.

Suits, B. (1973a). The Elements of Sport, in: (ed.) Osterhoudt R., The philosophy of sport: A collection of original essays, Thomas, Springfield, IL.

Suits, B. (1973b). The Grasshopper: A Thesis Concerning the Moral Ideal of Man, in: Osterhoudt R., The philosophy of sport: A collection of original essays, Thomas, Springfield, IL.

Suits, B. (1974). Aristotle on the Function of Man, “Canadian Journal of Philosophy”, 4, 23-40.

Suits, B. (1977). Appendix I: Words on Play, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”. 4, 117-31.

Suits, B. (1978). The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, University of Toronto Press, Toronto. (first edition)

Suits, B. McBride and Paddick on The Grasshopper, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, vol. VIII: 1981, 70-78.

Suits, B. (1982). Sticky Wickedness: Games and Morality, “Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review”, 21, 755-60.

Suits, B. (1984a). The Grasshopper: Posthumous Reflections on Utopia. In: (eds). Alexander, Peter and Roger Gill, Utopias, Gerald Duckworth & Co., Ltd, London, 197-209.

Suits, B. (1984b). Games and Utopia: Posthumous Reflections. “Simulation and Games”, 15 1 (March), 5-24.

Suits, B. (1985). The Detective Story. A case Study of Games in Literature, “Canadian Review of Comparative Literature“, XII.2, 200-219.

Suits, B. (1988a). On McBride on the Definition of Games, in: Philosophic Inquiry in Sport, ed. William J. Morgan and Klaus V. Meier, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 55–62.

Suits, B. (1988b). Tricky Triad: Games, Play, and Sports, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”. 15, 1-9.

Suits, B. (1989). The Trick of the Disappearing Goal, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”. 16, 1-12.

Suits, B. (2004). Venn and the Art of Category Maintenance, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”. 31.1, 1-14.

Suits, B. (2005). The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Orchard Park, NY: Broadview Press Ltd. (second edition)

Suits, B. (2006). Games and their Institutions in The Grasshopper, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”. 33.1, 1-8.

Suits, B. (2014). The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Broadview Press, Peterborough. (third edition)

 

2) Works concerning Bernard Suits’s philosophy

Bäck, A. (2008). The Paper World of Bernard Suits, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 35(2), October, 156-174.

Berman M., (2013) Sport, Sprint, Suits, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, vol. 40, Issue -1, 163-176.

Berman N., (2015). Sport as a Thick Cluster Concept, Presented in Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/Berman_Cluster_concept_of_sport.pdf

Charlson, C. (2011). The “Playing” Field – Attitudes Activities and the Conflation of Play and Games, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 38(1), May, 74-87.

Chou Y. (2010). Toward an Understanding of „The Grasshopper“ – Through Two Perspectives, in: (ed.) A. Hardum, C. Jones, Philosophy of Sport – International Perspective, Cambridge Scholar Publishers.

Ellis, J. (2011). On the Concept of a Game, “Philosophical Investigations”, 34:4 October, 381-392.

Geras, N. (2009). Games and Meanings, in: (eds.), de Wijze S., Kramer M. H., Carter I., Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges, Routledge, London, 185-200.

Holowchak, M., Barkasi, M. (2008). An Impromptu Visit to Rien-à-Faire A Tribute to Bernard Suits, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 35, 111-119.

Holowchak, M. (2007). Games as Pastimes in Suits’s Utopia: Meaningful Living and the “Metaphysics of Leisure”, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 34.1, 88-96.

Hurka, T. (2005/2014). Introduction, in: Suits, B., The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Broadview Press.

Hurka, T. (2015).  Slightly restricted slightly revised, Presented on Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/Hurka_Suits_on_games.pdf

Hurka, T. (2006). Games and the Good, Part I. “Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 80” (Suppl.), 217–235.

Hurka, T. (2004). Normative Ethics: Back to the Future, In: B. Leiter (ed.), The Future for Philosophy, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 246–264.

Innis, R. (2001). Philosophy and the Play of Life, „Focaal – European Journal of Anthropology“, 37, 121–142.

King, P. (2015). Games and pastimes, Presented on Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/King_games_and_pastimes.pdf

Kollers A. (2015). The Grasshopper’s Error, „Dialogue“, 54 (4), 727-746.

Kretchmar, R S. (1989). On Beautiful Games, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 16, 34-43.

Kretchmar, R S. (2006). The Intelligibility of Suits’s Utopia: The View from Anthropological Philosophy, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 33.1, 67-77.

Lopez Frias J. (2016). The Reconstructive and Normative Aspects of Bernard Suits’ Utopia, “Reason Papers”, Vol. 38, no. 1, 51-64.

Lopez Frias J. (2017). A Kantian view of Suits Utopia a kingdom, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, vol. 44, Issue 1, 138-151.

McBride, F. (1979). A Critique of Mr. Suits’ Definition of Game Playing, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”. 6, 59-65.

Meier, K. V. (1988). Triad Trickery: Playing with Sport and Games, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 15, 11-30.

Morgan, K. (2008). Some Further words on suits on play, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 35, 120-141.

Morgan, K. (2015). On Suits on Normativity of Games, Presented on Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/Morgan_On_Suits_on_Normativity_of_Games.pdf

Papineu, D. (2015). Sports and Games, Presented on Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/Papineau_Sports_and_Games.pdf

Ridge, M. (2015) Cheating and Trifling, Presented on Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/Ridge_Cheating_and_Trifling_draft_2.pdf

Rives, J. (1984) The defence of the ant: Work, Life and Utopia, „Canadian Journal of Philosophy”, Vol. 14, No. 4 (Dec.), 617-629.

Royce, R. (2011). Suits, autotelicity, temporal reallocations, game resources and defining “play”, “Sport, Ethics and Philosophy”, 2, May, 93-109.

Ryall, E. (2013). Playing with words. Further comment on Suits’ Definition, in: Ryall, E., Russell, W. and MacLean, M. (eds.,) The Philosophy of Play, Routledge, London, 44-53.

Schneider, A. J. (2001). Fruits, apples and category mistakes, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, XXVIII, 151-159.

Schneider, A.J., Butcher, R.B. (1997) Pre-lusory goal for games a gambit declined, XXIV, 38-46.

Tasioulas, J. (2006). Games and the Good, Part II, “Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society” 80 (Suppl.), 237–264.

Thi Nguyen C. (2015). The Forms and Fluidity of Game Play, Presented on Games, Play, and Sports: After Suits, University of Toronto

https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/uploaded_files/content/1630/file/Nguyen_Forms_and_Fluidity_of_Game_Play.pdf

Thompson, K. (2004). Sport and Utopia, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 31.1, 60-63.

Vossen, D. P. (2004). The Nature and Classification of Games, “Avante”, Vol.10, No. 1, 53 – 68.

Vossen, D. P. (2008a). Good Grasshopping and the Avoidance of Game-Spoiling, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, 35, 175-192.

Vossen, D. P. (2008b). Chess is not a Game, in: Hales D., (ed.) Philosophy Looks at Chess, Open Court, Chicago and la Salle, Illinois, 191-208.

Vossen, D. P. (2015). Utopia is Intelligible and Game-Playing is What Makes Utopia Intelligible, “Journal of the Philosophy of Sport”, vol. 43. Issue 2, 251-265.

6th Czech Philosophy of Sport Conference, Brno, 26-28th October, 2017

Dates26. – 28. 10. 2017

http://cpsc2017.fsps.muni.cz/ 

Venue: Faculty of Sports Studies, Masaryk University, Building A33 / room 227
            University campus – Kamenice  5, 625 00 Brno 

We cordially invite colleagues from PSS/CKS, BPSA, EAPS, IAPS to participate!

Scientific Committee:
Ivo Jirásek

Jim Parry
Irena Martínková
Martin Zvonař
Emanuel Hurych

Organizing Committee: 
Emanuel Hurych
Dagmar Heiland Trávníková
Jim Parry

Invited Keynote Speakers:
prof. Jim Parry
 (Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague)

More keynote speakers will be added soon!

Conference Registration: FREE
(please fill out the REGISTRATION FORM, and email as a Word.doc to cpsc2017@fsps.muni.cz, with REGN in the title)

Please register as soon as possible.  Registration deadline: August 31st , 2017

Call for Abstracts:
Guidelines for Abstract Submission:
– Send abstract (200-300 words) as soon as possible – final submission date: August 31st , 2017

– Accepted abstracts will receive notification within 2 weeks – final date: September 13th, 2017
– Required format is MS Word Times New Roman 12pt, single spacing, with name, institution, abstract, indicative bibliography; all to fit on one side of A4
– Abstracts to be submitted electronically to s.j.parry@leeds.ac.uk with ABSTRACT in the title
– Book of Abstracts will be emailed to participants in advance, with hard copy at registration

Abstracts must be prepared in English. 20 minutes ONLY for summary presentation time,(+40 mins discussion).  Please don’t just read a 60-minute paper really fast!!
Publication:  Final papers may be considered for publication in a range of journals associated in various ways with BPSA, EAPS and its members, in accordance with normal submission guidelines, e.g.: Sport, Ethics and PhilosophyStudia SportivaActa Universitatis Carolinae – Kinanthropologica; etc.

There will also be a section devoted to philosophical reflections on Olympism and the Olympic Movement, supported by the Czech Olympic Academy.

The conference is held under the auspices of the Dean of Faculty of Sports Studies, MU, doc. Jiří Nykodým, Ph.D.

Minutes: EXECUTIVE MEETING EAPS 25-4-2017 (Nijmegen)

List of Participants

Andrew Edgar; Arno Müller;  Lev Kreft; Francisco Javier López Frías; Ron Welters

Members of the Executive Committee not present at the meeting

Irena Parry; Teresa Lacerda; Ivo Jirasek; Emily Ryall; Mila Hosta; Nils Baratella; Bernard Andrieu; José Luis Pérez Triviño; Emanuel Hurych.

Meeting

a) We discussed the possibility of holding the 2020 EAPS-BAPS conference in Paris. Bernard Andrieu would be the organizer of the conference.

b) Arno Müller gave an update on the state of EAPS finances. Arno confirmed that Bernard Andrieu’s payment for the 2014 EAPS-BAPS conference has been received and gave the executive board details about the balance of the EAPS bank account.

c) Related to the financial statement, Arno Müller raised two questions. One had to do with what to do with the funds in the bank account. He proposed the creation of student travel grants to attend the next EAPS-BAPS meeting. The other question was related to methods to formalize a €5-10 annual payment for members. This would help EAPS become a stronger organization and have a better system to define who the members of the Association are. Arno suggested that money transfers through PayPal would be the best way to collect the money.

d) Lev Kreft proposed to use the mailing lists of the last three EAPS conferences (Prague, Nancy, and Nijmegen) to create our mailing list.

e) Arno Müller suggested that the payment for the domain and website should be transferred to somebody else. Javi López offered to be in charge of making the payment through his bank account.

f) The current executive board was reelected.

g) We congratulated Ron Welters for the organization of the 2017 EAPS-BAPS in Nijmegen.

 

Call for papers: Special Issue: “The emergence of e-sports: Challenges and Opportunities.” Sport, Ethics, and Philosophy

Special Issue: “The emergence of e-sports: Challenges and Opportunities.”

Editors: José Luis Pérez Triviño and Francisco Javier López Frías

An article in TIME Magazine regarded the emergence of e-Sports as one of the most profound and challenging advances in contemporary sport culture.  E-sports constitute a social phenomenon that brings together millions of players and has become a business of enormous proportions.  As a consequence of the increasing relevance and success of e-sports, a debate has been raised within international sport organizations on the recognition of e-sports not only as real sports but also as Olympic sports.  This raises important questions within the philosophy of sport, especially related to the ontological nature of both e-sports and sports.  However, the debate on the ontology of e-sports does not exhaust the possibilities of the philosophical debate on e-sports.  Issues related to the governance of e-sports competitions, the organization of e-sports institutions, and the relationship between e-sports and human nature, among others, are relevant as well.

This special issue of Sport, Ethics, and Philosophy is dedicated to the main conceptual, philosophical, moral and legal questions that are being raised by the development of e-sports in the context of sport and physical education.  We invite scholars to submit papers for this special issue. The following topics and question could be addressed in more detail:

– E-sports and the definition of sport.

–  Ethical issues within e-sports competitions. Doping, match-fixing, cheating, etc.

–  E-sports and sport aesthetics.

–  E-sports and the interpretation of sporting rules.

–  E-sports competitions and institutions. Ethics and good governance.

–  E-sports and anthropology (the sporting body in a digital environment).

–  E-sports and new technologies. A new sport paradigm?

–  E-sports and legal issues: the creation of associations, the legal forms of e-sports clubs, the structure of e-sports competitions, and the legal status of e-sports players.

Those interested in contributing with a manuscript to the special issue, please, submit a tentative title and a brief abstract for review (500 words) to the editors.

For further questions and inquiries, contact: Jose Luis Perez (jose.perez@upf.edu) and Francisco Javier López (fjl13@psu.edu)

Abstract deadline: July 18, 2017.

Notification of abstract acceptance by August 9, 2017.

Full manuscript Deadline: September 31, 2017.

Length: 6,000-8,000 words (inclusive of references and notes).

Further information about the journal: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rsep20

Instructions for authors: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=rsep20

Download the call for papers

EAPS. Elections for Officers. Deadline. April 21

My EAPS members,

We are due to have elections for the officers of the Association this year, so the following posts will be elected at our AGM in Nijmegen: President, Vice-President, Secretary-General, Treasurer, and Non-Delegate Members.  If you would be interested in filling any of these posts, or if there is someone you wish to proposes, please submit a name and contact details to the EAPS Secretary fjl13@psu.edu before midnight 21st April.  Existing office holders are allowed to be submitted for a further term.